Monday, 12 March 2012

Thirty One charity music collection released today for CALM


The Temple, converted from a public convenience to a bar in the 1990s. It's a favourite haunt of Manchester band
Elbow.

Today I am posting about a Manchester music charity CD and download entitled Thirty One Songs, available in shops from 12th March. Thirty One Songs is a collection of tracks from Manchester featuring rare and exclusive songs from both established and emerging acts.  http://www.thirtyonesongs.com/ I was invited to the launch last month but was unable to attend, so I wanted to post about it today, as it hits the shops.

All profits from the release will go to CALM (the Campaign Against Living Miserably) a registered charity with its roots in Manchester. The ambition of Thirty One is to raise sufficient funds to enable CALM to run their national freephone helpline service (tel: 0800 58 58 58). Suicide is the biggest killer of men in the UK under 35.

Thirty One is "an amazing snapshot capturing the undeniable quality of the Manchester music scene. It features brand new material by artists with careers stretching back to the post-punk era. It is an album much like the city from which it originates: rich in musical variety". It ranges from the bass heavy sounds of Murkage, to the delicate stylings of Sara Lowes and the stunning, original new talent of Ruby Ann Patterson. The better known Manchester artistes on the CD include Elbow, I Am Kloot, Mr Scruff, Durutti Column, Barry Adamson (Magazine) and Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds.

All of the songs have been donated by the artists for Thirty One and costs £10, £20 or £31, depending on what you can afford to donate.

This photo is linked to Lesley's Signs, Signs blog in Ontario.

9 comments:

  1. A great way to raise money!

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  2. Hi Chrissy,

    The Temple (of convenience) - not been in there for a while. Will have to pop in there next time I'm in town.

    :0)

    Cheers

    PM

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  3. Wow! That suicide statistic is something I would never have guessed. I wonder why that is? A "public convenience" means toilet, right?

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    1. Yes public convenience is UK old speak for a toilet for public use, Lowell.

      Depression is more common in women than in men, yet suicide is more common in men. Experts think that depression is often more difficult to diagnose in men because they do not complain of these typical symptoms so often. They are less likely to admit to distress and if they do consult their doctor, they tend to focus on physical complaints.(www.netdoctor.co.uk)

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  4. Where would we be without the Manchester Sound(s), so many bands, so much great music! Looks like a very worthwhile project. Your shot looks like a record cover, well done.

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  5. I like the acronym CALM.
    Though, I admit I haven't heard of any of these bands, but what a great idea!

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  6. This is literally an underground music scene!

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