Monday, 23 April 2012

Cry 'God for Harry, England, and St George.'


For St. George's Day in England, which is also the birthday and deathday of William Shakespeare (reputedly), I present to you The Shakespeare pub on Fountain Street in the city centre. A relief of Shakespeare is above the entrance and there's a portrait of him on the pub sign.

An inn has stood on this site since 1771. The present building however actually dates from 1656, and used to be The Shambles Inn in Chester, until it was dismantled, transported to Manchester and reassembled in its present form in 1928.

It is reputedly haunted by the ghost of a young woman who died having been assaulted by the chef, who later hanged himself - the rope marks are still visible on a ceiling beam. (http://www.manchester2002-uk.com/)

"Cry 'God for Harry, England, and St George'." is from the "Once more unto the breach, dear friends..." speech which is spoken by King Henry V in Shakespeare's Henry V, Act III, 1598.

This post is linked to the Weekly Top Shot blog.

10 comments:

  1. Old buildings have so much more character than new ones.

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  2. Funny I was talking about this famous speech from Henry V today! Great looking pub.

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  3. An impressive building and an interesting quote I, sadly, din't recognize at first!

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  4. A lovely building and great commentary. So much history there. Got to be careful of those ghosts, though; especially of young women who hanged themselves. :-) I figured the quote was from some great military leader (in real life!) ... hope you have a great week.

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  5. I love the facade, a beautiful building!
    Léia

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  6. Great looking place Chrissy! Would love to visit.

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  7. Gorgeous timbered building! I have a thing for this kind of architecture. :)

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  8. St. George's Day over here as well, being celebrated by everyone named so. Miss having a Guinness. Please have a good Tuesday.

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  9. How delightfully English! Great pic.
    Interestingly, St George is the patron saint of Greece, also.

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